Corn Stalks as Pea Stakes

Our corn grew to a ginormous 10′ height this year in our raised pallet beds. The roots of corn are very sturdy; we usually cut the stalks above the roots, and allow the roots to stay in the ground to decompose. Often they are there a year later, still holding the soil.

Miranda being consumed by corn and zucchini.

As it is October and, despite the 95 degree F. temperatures and hot, dry Santa Ana winds that are so typical of Fall here in Southern California, it is time to plant winter crops. Peas are the top of the list to plant. There are many types of peas. Some are valued to be eaten as pods when the peas inside haven’t matured. Some – and these are my favorite – produce juicy round peas that can be shelled and frozen for use all year. Some produce a lot of tendrils, and these along with the new leaves and shoots are eaten in salads and stir-fries, and are very attractive. There are also cowpeas, which are really beans that enjoy warmer weather, so not a candidate for winter crops. Best of all, peas and the rest of the legume family set nitrogen in the soil. They have a symbiotic relations ship with certain bacteria that must live in your soil for this to happen. The plant harvests nitrogen out of the atmosphere, and stores it in nodules on its roots. When the roots die, either from the plant being cut back or dying, the nitrogen is released into the soil in a plant-usable form. No need for chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

King Tut peas are good eating before and after the peas form in the pods. The peas are green.
King Tut flowers are gorgeous.

One of the problems I’ve had growing the tall peas is having the best supports for them, especially in raised beds. I never seem to have tall enough posts, or the posts fall over and chaos ensues. This year we decided that we’d already grown our pea supports: our corn.

Cutting corn
Trimming a few feet off the corn. I’m 5’3″ tall, for comparison. I have a phone in my back pocket and my pants are loose, so please don’t think I’m that saggy!

We cut the corn stalks down to about 8 feet; above that the stalk was a little weak, and the stalks would be tall enough for our purposes. Then we planted vining (not bush) peas in and around the base of the corn. We had a lot of success with King Tut peas last year, which had beautiful purple pods (but green peas), so we opted for more of these in this bed.

Miranda planting around the corn. We left some of the cut sweet potato vines we’d just harvested from this bed to help hide and protect the pea seeds, and to return nutrition back into the soil.

Now the peas are growing rapidly, and we’ll be able to train them up the sturdy, straight corn stalks with the help of some twine. When the peas are done, we can either use the stalks all over again for another climber, depending upon how they last over winter, or we cut the corn and the pea plants at the surface of the soil and put the whole pile into a compost pile, or into another raised bed. Corn is a hungry plant, so the pea’s nitrogen-fixing capability will help restore fertility to that raised bed. Remember that we use no fertilizer other than in-bed composting using kitchen scraps, plant cuttings, manure from our hens, and leaves, and anything else that will decompose. The beds are being watered by salty well water, too.

Baby peas are shooting up quickly.

To help deter mice we sprinkle red pepper flakes over the seeds, and Miranda makes up a spray bottle full of hot sauce and water and sprays the beds in the evenings.

Re-purposing is so fun, especially when the result is better soil, healthier plants, and less work for us!

Repurposing At Its Best: The Bar-Be-Rolla

When your garden carts just won’t do the job: Introducing the Bar-Be-Rolla. Its a lightweight wheeled cart that can hold liquids or solids, piles of wood, scraps of urbanite, mulch, wet mud, etc. And as you can see, its almost entirely made from an abandoned Bar-B-Que grill. My friend Louis, who has contributed inventions and repairs to Finch Frolic Garden, saw the neighbor’s grill set out for garbage, and then saw possibilities. 

Because the dome, which became the bucket, is made of aluminum, this gadget is super light. The original tires may need to be replaced with stronger ones, but otherwise it works just great. And one less item for the dump.

The legs became the handle, with added wood in between for connection. A board was used to make it stand up when resting, only because that was at hand. If you make your own, be sure that the board, or whatever you use as a kickstand, is high enough to clear the ground when the device is being wheeled. 

I think this is a brilliant re-purposing of someone else’s junk. And fun to say. Bar-Be-Rolla. Even Jane Fonda might like one!