Summer At Finch Frolic Garden

Squash, melons, tomatoes, flowers, tomatillos, sweet potatoes and more flourish along a chain link fence and on a wire-and-post trellis we set up over buried wood.  Vertical space is perfect for vines; the vines provide shade and protection for other plants, and mulch plus a harvest when they die down.  They are exciting and fun to watch grow as  well.

Squash, melons, tomatoes, flowers, tomatillos, sweet potatoes and more flourish along a chain link fence and on a wire-and-post trellis we set up over buried wood. Vertical space is perfect for vines; the vines provide shade and protection for other plants, and mulch plus a harvest when they die down. They are exciting and fun to watch grow as well.

 

I’ve wanted to show you more of the garden, using video as well as photos.  The summer garden is beautiful and full of life.  Life in the ground, in the water, in the air and on every plant.  Last year the pond had an overgrowth of pond weed and algae.  Since our pond is natural – meaning that it has no liner, just compressed clay, and is cleaned only by plants and fish with no other aeration or filtration – the idea of adding algaecide is unthinkable.  In great pond water there are as many if not more microbes as in good soil.  Algaecide may advertise that it doesn’t harm fish or frogs, but it will kill the small pond life that is keeping your pond and its animals healthy.  Seven small koi were added (rescued from a golf course pond where they had been dumped) in the hopes that they would eat the emergent pond weed as it grew out of dormancy.  We hadn’t seen the koi and thought that they were dead.  A couple of months ago they were sighted: all  seven, each about a foot long and magnificent.  We have no pond weed nor algae overgrowth thanks to these beauties.

In the following short video you’ll see some of the koi and possibly some of the bluegill and mosquito fish that also inhabit the pond.  Notice a small blue dragonfly alighting on the bamboo pole.  Birds call out all around.  You’ll also hear my work shoes squeaking!  The size and vigor of the water lilies is due to the healthy, microbially balanced water.  We keep the pond topped up from the well. Well water here in San Diego County is notoriously salty and mineral-laden.  Plants and microbes remediate that water, as is obvious in this video.  The last part is of the native marsh fleabane which was sown by wild birds and flourishes around the pond.  The small groups of flowers are perfect for our tiny native insects to land upon and feed.  A honeybee uses it here.  Enjoy with me a moment by the pond; the following link will send you to a Youtube video:

Summer on the Finch Frolic Garden Pond

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